Useful fungi described
By: Christyl Rivers
Mycologist Paul Stamets believes in the marvelous mushroom. Stamets, of Washington state, has researched ways in which fungi could be of great value for use as filtration systems for purifying water, for medicine, for protecting soil, for use as insecticide, for use in toxic clean...
By: Dr Pandula Siribaddana
The ability to mutate is a prerequisite for most bacteria and viruses if they were to adapt to the ever-changing living environments and challenges. Swine flu is no different and its mutational ability made it possible for the virus to transit from infecting pigs to...
How humans benefit from bacteria
By: Kate Wheeling
Microorganisms were completely unknown to science until 1676 when Antonie van Leeuwenhoek observed bacteria for the first time on a hand-crafted single-lens microscope. Another 200 years would pass before Louis Pasteur provided the first evidence supporting the germ theory of disease. In today’s world...
By: Helen Lovetigers
What should one know about the devious bacteria Bartonella? Well, first of all, there are two serotypes of it: Seroptype I is Houston-1 and Serotype 2 is Marseille. The different classifications are based on the slight but still significant differences in the 16S ribosomal DNA...
By: Dr Pandula Siribaddana
Bartonella is a genus of bacteria consisting of many different species out of which almost eight species have been recognized as potentially harmful or pathogenic towards human beings. Due to its ability to reproduce either within or outside the cell, the Bartonella species is also...
Olfaction in bacteria
By: Lane Olinghouse
As if humans have too little to worry about, a convocation of mirobioligists recently published data indicating that some bacteria possess the facility of olfaction. Bacteria have long been held responsible, in olfactory terms, for creating a multitude of malodorous bouquets. Some of the more...
By: Dr Pandula Siribaddana
The ability to smell is inherited by almost all developed organisms, which is facilitated by specialized organs and cells. However, until very recent times, scientists were unaware of the olfaction of bacteria although they knew the same to exist among yeast and certain other organisms...
By: Heather Brennan
A macromolecule is a large molecule made up of smaller units called monomers. These monomers can be combined in thousands of different ways to create a multitude of macromolecules. There are four basic types of macromolecules: proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. The first three...
By: Menaka Ratnayake
Throughout life, all living organisms undergo changes in relation to their size, complexity, function, etc. Almost all of these changes are the result of four types of macromolecules. These are the carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The reason for these molecules to be referred...
Four categories of biological macromolecules
By: Dr. Bryan Katz
In biology, a macromolecule refers to any agglomerate or polymer made up of smaller building blocks, or monomers. Traditionally, the study of biological macromolecules was highly compartmentalized. While some scientists devote their entire careers to the study of specific proteins, carbohydrates, lipids or nucleic acids...

 

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