By: Julie Thomas-Zucker
The differences between free living and parasitic protozoans include temperature change, movement, where it lives, and its ecological impact. Protozoans are bacteria. Some bacteria help to break down organisms in the soil and compost. They help with ecology. They also are food for fish and...
By: Jean Horak
Shigella is a gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that belongs to the tribe Escherichieae within the family Enterobacteriaceae. These bacteria are closely related to the genus Escherichia which is best known for the E. coli species. Unlike E. coli, none of the Shigella species are part of...
Bacterium profile: Shigella
By: Joann Spears
In the not-very politically correct Middle Ages, dysentery was known as ‘the bloody flux’. Both dysentery and flux are general terms that describe severe diarrhea, often with blood present in the stool. The condition has various causative agents; Shigella is one of them. The...
Bacterium profile: Staphylococcus epidermidis
By: Jean Horak
Many people have heard of the genus Staphylococcus. The most popular bacteria in this genus are Staphylococcus aureus which is responsible for a multitude of diseases within the human population. One of the more overlooked bacterium from this genus is Staphylococcus epidermidis. This species was...
By: Dr. Bryan Katz
Over the years, microbiologists have discovered several mechanisms by which bacteria release toxins and other products into their environment. Gram positive bacteria like Staph and Strep seem to employ one major secretory apparatus whereas gram negative bacteria appear to have evolved six separate ones. This...
An overview of bacterial type VI secretion systems
By: Jennifer Boyd
A secretion is when something is released or oozes if you throw in the bacteria, you have a bacterial secretion. The easiest way to remember what a secretion is is to think of something being transported from the inside of a cell to the outside...
Fun facts about bacteria
By: Christyl Rivers
Bacteria are one of the very essential things that make life possible on earth. They live mostly on temperate areas, on skin, in the body, but also outside the human body. Some can survive close to the boiling point; some survive on ice and in...
By: Evelyn Berger
A bacteria is a tiny, single-celled prokaryote microorganism. They have many shapes and external features, and are usually only a few micrometers long. Bacteria live almost everywhere on earth, from water to radioactive waste, and are some of the most persistent life forms known to...
By: Amelia Emery
Bacteria, known as prokaryotes, are microscopic single-celled organisms. They are found in abundance in every type of climate and environment on Earth as well as the intestines, mouths, skin, feathers, fur, or scales of other living organisms. Some are pathogenic and will cause illness while...
Reproduction of bacterial cells
By: Gioia Degenaars
Bacteria prokaryotes means they are very simple, single-celled organisms. The majority of their reproduction is done asexually via binary fission. This means that they simply double their genetic material and divide in half, much like cell division. The advantage to bacteria to reproduce in this...

 

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