Are viruses living organisms?
By: M E Skeel
If the definition of life is that it must be made of cells, then the answer is no, because viruses are not surrounded by a cellular membrane. However, perhaps it is time to revisit the definition of life, because viruses can certainly act like living...
Preparation of tissue for light microscopy
By: Frank Kero
The scientific community has long used methods of descriptive observation as a means of reducing the mysteries of nature into discrete and finite systems. Analogous to the utility of telescopes in describing spectral features of the night sky, optical microscopy seeks to mitigate the limitations...
Protozoa: What are suctorial ciliates?
By: M E Skeel
Many single-celled animals live free in the water but others have a stalk and attach themselves to substrates. The ciliated protozoa that are classified as suctoria are specialised, stalked ciliates. The basic shape is an inverted bell for a body that is lined with spikey...
Bio-breakthrough: Researchers store data in bacteria
By: Terrence Aym
Ten years ago futurists predicted that one day data would be stored in living organisms like bacteria. They picked 2020 as the date the feat would be accomplished.They were only off by ten years.During late 2010, a team of biochemistry students at the...
By: Amanda Mittra
There are two trophic levels in an ecosystem, namely the autotrophs and the heterotroophs. In simple terms, there are two sets of members placed in an ecosystem based on their modes of energy production. Autotrophs are those that produce energy from sunlight and inorganic material...
How autotrophs differ from heterotrophs in obtaining energy
By: Lisa Putnam
Every living organism needs energy to survive. Energy can be gained by consuming food. There are two main ways living organisms can get food and they are grouped as either being an autotroph or heterotroph. Autotrophs, also known as producers, have the unique ability to...
By: Kat Centeno
An ecosystem is an ecological and biological environment where its members include plants, animals, sun, soil and water. The components in an ecosystem interact with each other for survival. The food chain is a complex representation of the producer-consumer relationship in an ecosystem. The energy...
An overview of the quasispecies model of sequence evolution
By: Matt Bird
Typically when a person thinks of a species, they think of a single unit. Dogs. Cats. Birds. There are derivations of that species, true - Labradors and Terriers, Siamese and Himalayans, Parrots and Sparrows - but even so, individuals belonging to that group are roughly...
An overview of the quasispecies model of sequence evolution
By: Effie Moore Salem
A Quasispecies model of sequence evolution is necessary for scientists as a labeling tool for organisms with particular replicating habits. This method is a hangover from Darwinian science and is in direct opposite from species. Species are usually true to their inheritance and mutate slower...
By: Suzanne Rose
The quasispecies model of sequence evolution describes a group or cloud of related genotypes with a great deal of mutations. In comparison to a species in which genotypes tend to remain stable from one generation to the next, the offspring in a quasispecies have different...

 

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