By: Cicely Richard
Microbial physiology is a subgroup of the study of microbiology. This division, however, studies the biochemical functions of microbial cells. Microbial physiology examines microbial growth, metabolism and cell structure. Like other areas of microbiology, microbial physiology has interested people for hundreds of years. Initially, microbial...
By: Virginia Gaces
Fungi are eukaryotic organisms that could be found in air, water and soil. They can be harmful or harmless. They are often called the "garbage disposers" because they feed on rotting, organic matter in the environment.Fungi dispersal mechanisms differ in some ways for each...
By: Nancy Houser
The words HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) and AIDS (acquired immunity deficiency syndrome) have become synonymous on a global basis, associated with feelings of hate, fear, terror, death, and ignorance. I say ignorance because of the lack of understanding, lack of adequate knowledge, lack of caring...
By: Janet Grischy
Microorganisms are the foundation of the cycles that take the essential elements of life from the environment to any organism and back again. Tiny as they are, microorganisms are the engines that keep the wheel of life turning. The Carbon Cycle This cycle takes carbon...
A look at microbial physiology
By: Effie Moore Salem
Learning how the microbes work is an ongoing process. Scientist learn one new thing and that opens up other possibilities. Microbial physiology is a science dealing with the makeup of microbes. It is part of the peculiar and important makeup of the living cells that...
The importance of microorganisms in the Earth's ecosystems
By: Effie Moore Salem
The importance of leaning what makes us sick makes up a great part of the study of microbiology. Microorganisms can make us sick, cure us, clean up our dirty waste, and work tirelessly for us and often without our knowing of what they are up...
By: Cicely Richard
Symbiosis is the relationship between two or more distinct biological organisms. Many of these interactions work together to the benefit of both beings, as sometimes one cannot survive without the other. Others become bonds in which one organism suffers as the other feeds off it...
By: Virginia Gaces
Algae(alga-singular) are eukaryotes which are unicellular in nature and are classified under the kingdom Protista. They exist in a symbiotic relationship with their surroundings, because they "give and take" simultaneously, without rendering harm to the other organisms. The environment nurtures the growth of algae and...
The final battle in the war against HIV and AIDS
By: Ben Weeks
THE FINAL BATTLE IN THE WAR AGAINST HIV AND AIDSby Benjamin WeeksIt was in June, 1981 when the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published an article in its weekly bulletin, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly (MMWR) that first reported what would later become known...
A look at algae's symbiotic relationships
By: Shawn Bailey
Two important symbiotic relationships concerning algae are the Lichens and coral reefs. Things that live in symbiosis have relationships that benefit at least one of the participants. There are three common types of symbiosis: Parasitic, in which only one entity benefits, may depend fully on...

 

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