Sharks and extra sensory perception
By: Jennifer Hartley
Sharks have powerful senses which make them highly successful predators. In addition to standard senses, they have developed a remarkable ability to pick up the electrical signals that are produced by all living things. This process is called electro-reception.Electrical receptors are located on a...
Insights into the lives of Amphipods (Crustacea: Amphipoda)
By: M E Skeel
Amphipods are an interesting and important group of crustaceans, with about 8000 species known world-wide. They are predominantly marine but there are some fresh water species and even a few terrestrial forms, known as beach fleas. These are the only crustaceans to successfully colonise the...
Unravelling the complexity of Crustacean anatomy and taxonomy
By: M E Skeel
Crustaceans are sometimes called the insects of the sea, because they are both Mandibulate Arthropods and because, while the insects may rule on land, the crustaceans rule in the water. The other great group of Arthropods are the Chelicerates, which are animals such as spiders...
Eating habits of Great White sharks
By: Sandra Petersen
Great white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) have gotten a bad reputation for attacking humans. Contrary to myth and misinformation, great white sharks do not desire human beings as prey. To unravel the mystery behind how great white sharks capture their prey, scientists have examined what these...
The twisted world of gastropods (Mollusca: Class Gastropoda)
By: M E Skeel
The gastropods are animals like snails and slugs, limpets and whelks, abalone and cone shells. They form the largest class in the Phylum Mollusca. Gastropod means stomach-foot and all the members of this class are possessed of this strange characteristic: a big muscular foot on...
Facts about Chitons (Mollusca: Class Polyplacophora)
By: M E Skeel
Ah the Amphineura. What are they and does anybody care? I do, because I like primitive forms and the 8 plated chitons are the second most primitive members of a pretty important invertebrate phylum, the Mollusca. Only the mysterious solenogasters, the aplacophora, may be more...
Pelecypods: The lives of bivalve molluscs
By: M E Skeel
The phylum mollusca has a Class named Pelecypoda, which means hatchet footed and refers to the shape of the foot in these mostly sessile bivalves. Clams and Oysters, Mussels and Pippies are all pelecypods Some of the most economically important shellfish are pelecypods, starting with...
How to become a shark biologist
By: James Johnson
How to become a shark biologist? Simple: learn to swim and dive, get a good education in marine biology, and then work really hard learning about some of the most fascinating sea creatures in the oceans. To be a successful shark biologist, there will also...
The amazing cephalopods: Nautilus, squid and octopus
By: M E Skeel
If brains are the crown of creation then the crown of the Mollusc Phylum goes to the Cephalopods. They can't match human intelligence, but for invertebrates, an octopus is about as clever as it gets. There are about 700 known species of these fascinating animals...
By: Janet Grischy
The cephalopods are an amazing group. The octopus, squid, cuttlefish and nautilus are intelligent, well adapted, and behave in ways that humans can relate to, and yet they are each of a form that makes them seem utterly unlike us, to the extent that they...

 

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