How sonar affects whales
By: Trenna Sue Hiler
Whales are acoustic mammals. They use their hearing to follow migratory routes, find food, care for their young and locate one another. The process is called echolocation. Whale songs have long been studied to try and determine just how valuable the method of communication is...
By: Kathy Stemke
How could a whale have evolved from a mammal that lived and walked in the forest to an animal that lives and swims with its flippers in the sea? When most animals were developing limbs and climbing out of the earht's mighty oceans, whales were...
By: Diane Walsh
Records indicate the changes in whales took years to become the present day mammals that we watch flip their huge tails and dive out of sight, only to surface again to the delight of camera ready whale watching tourist. Scientists know that whales are mammals...
How whales evolved
By: Dawn R. Cole
Acceptable scientific theory has determined that life began in the oceans and, through millions of years of evolutionary transitions, sea creatures began to develop limbs instead of fins and flippers, and crawled out of the oceans to become the first land-dwellers. One might logically conclude...
By: Lee Templar
Whales are among the most specialised of all mammals. Their evolutionary adaptations to a wholly aquatic life have led to a body structure that has made them almost physically unrecognisable as mammals at all, and many people hold a popular misconception they are fish.The...
How sonar affects whales
By: Perry McCarney
Most people perceive the world around them predominantly through sight; whales, other cetaceans and many marine species perceive their oceanic world through sound, either passively or by emitting sound pulses then listening for their reflections returning; a technique called echolocation. So for whales, being in...
Why fish swim in schools
By: Anne StClair
Almost 80% of adults of the known species of fish swim in schools, at least during part of their life cycle, and they do this mainly because of two simple facts of nature: 1. Big fish eat little fish, and 2. There is safety in...
Why fish swim in schools
By: Mary Tyrer
"Why do fish swim in schools? Is the old joke often told, the answer. “To make them smart," has merit. In reality, not many species of fish swim together in what we call schools. However, the ones' that do display this behavior use...
How the octopus reproduces
By: Anne StClair
With eight poisonous tentacles, the octopus obviously reproduces with great care! The female has to choose particularly wisely too, because she dies when her young hatch, so her first choice of mate is also her last. The male does not fare much better, living only...
How sonar affects whales
By: Jyoti Joshi
How Sonar affect whales:Sonar Systems! Sonar systems produce intense waves of sound that just goes in the ocean like a light and it reveals objects in the path or tracks any activity under water. As a result it affects the habitat in the water body...

 

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