By: Judy Evans
The Columbine or aquilegia is a very pretty flower with a deceptively fragile appearance. Columbines are native to many countries and are suited for any of the planting zones from 3 to 9. The aquilegia caerulea (or aquilegia coerulea) is native to Colorado and neighbouring...
By: Judy Evans
Eucalyptus regnans has several common names including Mountain Ash, Stringy Gum, Victorian Ash, Swamp Gum and Tasmanian Oak. Builders, furniture makers and architects all hold the mountain ash in high esteem. It is one of the tallest tree species in the world and the tallest...
By: Judy Evans
The Quandong or native peach is a native Australian tree which belongs to the Santalaceae family and has the botanical name of Santalum acuminatum. It is also known as the sweet, desert or Western quandong. When in full fruit, the tree droops with its crop...
Do venus fly traps really work
By: Wayne Cracknell
Everyone has heard the stories, or maybe even seen footage of it. An unsuspecting fly goes off looking for some sweet nectar to get its grubby little feelers on. The fly spots the source of some juicy nectar and lands to feast upon it. The...
By: Lea Miller
Bougainvillea is a genus of brilliantly colored vines seen growing throughout the tropics. Originally native to South America, it has spread to warm climates worldwide because of its hardy and low-maintenance character. The vine is named for Admiral Louis Antoine de Bougainville, the Frenchman who...
By: Judy Evans
Callistemons are endemic to Australia. The genus has around 30 species – all highly ornamental, evergreen shrubs and small trees. They belong to the myrtle family (Myrtaceae). Because of the fascination of the home gardener with this striking genus, there are now a large range...
By: Judy Evans
The she-oaks (genera Casuarina and Allocasuarina) may not be particularly spectacular but they have their place in the Australian landscape. Because of the needle-like leaves they have the appearance of a conifer with attractive vertical lines. The she-oak family has the scientific name of Casuarinaceae...
By: Judy Evans
The she-oak family has the scientific name of Casuarinaceae. In 1982, the Casuarina genus was divided into four. The true Casuarina now has about 17 species, six of which are confined to Australia. She-oaks are tough and hardy. The genus Casuarina is a shapely, evergreen...
By: Judy Evans
Acacias are from the mimosa subfamily, which is itself part of the Fabaceae family. Fabaceaes are legumes and acacias have the typical pods which split to release hard seeds. The greater percentage of acacia species are found in Australia but acacias are also found in...
By: Judy Evans
The Hakea is endemic to Australia with the greatest number of its 150 odd species occurring in Western Australia. The genus is part of the protea family (Proteaceae) and arguably the most hardy of the family. Although closely related to the Grevilleas, the fruits of...

 

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