Trees of Australia: Tasmanian Blue Gum
By: Judy Evans
Eucalyptus globulus or Tasmanian Blue Gum belongs to the plant family Myrtaceae or myrtles. A French explorer, Jacques-Julien Houton de Labillardiere first described the tree in 1799. Eucalytus is derived from the Greek words ‘eu’ meaning ‘well’ and ‘kalypto’ ‘to cover&rsquo...
Trees of Australia: Salmon gum
By: Shirley Love
The stately salmon gum tree native to western Australia, can grow in access of seventy feet tall with a diameter of thirty inches or more. The bark is reddish pink in color, hence the name Salmon, but fades to grey in late summer. Its branches...
By: Judy Evans
The Snow Gum belongs to the family of myrtles which have the taxonomical name of Myrtaceae. The snow gum is one of the eucalypts - Eucalyptus pauciflora, pauciflora meaning ‘few flowers’ but that is a misnomer as the tree has a profuse and frequent...
By: Lian Slayford-Wei
Medicinal Plants in South-western Saudi Arabia Medicine, whether traditional folk medicine or mass-produced pharmaceutical drugs, have been beneficial in curing and treating all manner of diseases and illnesses throughout the centuries. Indeed, it is from the traditional folk medicine that has allowed us to make...
Overview: The red cherry
By: Phyllis Logie
Red cherries, especially the ‘tart’ variety is a superfruit, high in photochemical known as anthocyanins and in common with other fruits and vegetables red in colour, it has been shown to be of benefit to individuals who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes. It...
By: Lian Slayford-Wei
Medicinal Plants of Northern and Central Oman Traditional medicine is an alternative for many people who prefer natural remedies over the mass produced conventional drugs that companies create. Until recently, however, traditional medicine was the only source of treatment for many in parts of northern...
The meanings behind flower colors
By: Monika Johnson
In Victorian times, men gave small bouquets of flowers, known as tussie-mussies, to women to convey messages about feelings which they could not openly express. Each type of flower, as well as its color, had a symbolic meaning. Most of the symbolism sank into obscurity...
By: Judy Evans
The Golden Wattle (Acacia pycnantha) has great significance for all Australians. * In 1988, the Golden Wattle was formally designated the Floral Emblem of Australia although it had been unofficially accepted in 1901 to mark the Federation of Australia. * A wreath of wattle forms...
By: Judy Evans
Acacia aneura (Mulga or True Mulga) is a member of the Mimosaceae family. ‘Mulga’ was the name given by an aboriginal tribe to a small, flat shield. Mulga is a generic term given to a number of different species. Acacia aneura is the most...
By: Mohamad Fadzli
The use of plants as medicinal remedies has been going on for centuries. A quarter of the prescription drugs in modern medicine today is produced from raw materials found in the rainforest. Research is being carried out on the effectiveness of many other medicinal plants...

 

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