What is Salvia Divinorum?
By: Sarah Ganly
Salvia Divinorum has been given a bad rap; it has been exploited by the uninformed media, and it has been used by the uninformed public in ways that are not proper. Salvia divinorum is not a party drug; in fact it is not something...
Why are gymnosperms different than angiosperms?
By: Helena Whyte
Gymnosperms are plants that produce seeds but do not develop a flower or fruit. The name comes from Greek words and means naked seed. Gymnosperm seeds attach to the upper surfaces of exposed scales. Usually these scales bearing seeds are grouped together in cones. The...
What are ananas comosus?
By: R. Renee Bembry
Deciphering the term "Ananas Comosus" one may decide the first word "ananas" sounds akin to "bananas" and the second word "Comosus" sounds astrological or something of that nature, however, Ananas Comosus is the botanical name for the most popular edible Bromeliaceae plant family member otherwise...
By: Janet Grischy
The Citrus sinensis is the sweet orange, the fruit of a subtropical tree. It probably originated in Southeast Asia, most likely from a hybrid; no wild oranges have been found. Like all citrus, the orange is a member of one large species that can be...
By: Sarah Ganly
Many people have heard of San Pedro Cactus, and many people know of the psychoactive effects of this plant, but many people do not realize that there are many other psychoactive cacti available to them. This article will help you learn more about the psychoactive...
Common wildflowers in the Caribbean
By: James Johnson
Flowers are always beautiful and are found year round in the tropics, and that is especially true in the Caribbean. They bloom in winter, spring, summer and fall, and in every color imaginable. You can always ask at hotels what are the flowers being used...
Trees of Australia: Tuart
By: Judy Evans
The tuart (Eucalyptus gomphocephala – also known as the ‘white gum’ because of its pale bark and wood) is only found in Western Australia, along the narrow coastal corridor of the Swan Coastal Plain from Jurien Bay to Busselton. The tuart is a large...
Trees of Australia: Tingle
By: Judy Evans
There are three species of tingle tree. The largest and most impressive is the Red Tingle tree (Eucalyptus jacksonii). The tingles all belong to the family of myrtles (Myrtaceae). The tingles, along with the karri, jarrah and tuart, are all unique to Western Australia and...
Trees of Australia: Karri
By: Judy Evans
The Karri tree is one of four tree species that dominate the forest areas of south west Western Australia. The majestic karri is the tallest of Western Australia’s native trees and grows up to 90 metres in height. It is one of the world&rsquo...
Trees of Australia: Jarrah
By: Judy Evans
The four dominant tree species of the south west of Western Australia are jarrah, karri, tingle and tuart. These are all unique to the state and the forest regions of each species are home to a very diverse range of fauna and other flora species...

 

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