Why epiphytes grow in rainforests
By: James Johnson
Rainforest's are some of the most diverse, yet primitive, ecosystems found anywhere on the planet. They are believed to comprise over 90% of the biology species known, and at least 60% of those species are epiphytic, some say as much as 80%. Epiphytes, also frequently...
By: M E Skeel
I thought that this would be a simple question to answer but I soon got bogged down in definitions. A saprophyte is a kind of decomposer isn't it? It turns out that the answer is anything but simple. Saprophytes are first of all defined as...
The importance of epiphytes explained
By: James Johnson
An epiphyte is any plant that does not live in the soil, have true root systems, and frequently lives on another plant providing no benefit but causing no harm. This differentiates them from symbiotic plants (though they are often symbiotic with many other creatures) or...
By: M E Skeel
Epiphytes are plants that grow on other plants but are not parasites nor symbionts because they neither harm their host nor benefit it. Because of the competition for space and light in the forest, many plants have taken up an epiphytic lifestyle and in so...
By: M E Skeel
Rainforests are such diverse ecosystems that it is surprising to learn that most are growing on thin, poor soils that contain few nutrients. The key to the luxurient growth of the rainforest is dependent not on new nutrients but instead on the recycling efforts of...
By: M E Skeel
The flowering plants or Angiosperms are divided into two classes: the Monocotyledons or monocots and the Dicotyledons or dicots. The fundamental difference occurs during development: monocots have one seed leaf or cotyledon while dicots have two. This seemingly small difference separates the two major types...
Nature's recyclers: Saprophytes
By: James Johnson
There is a book available from Kew Gardens, "Agaric Folia of the Lesser Antilles" by Pegler and it lists over 400 mushrooms found in the Caribbean. It refers to identification, growth characteristics and where they grow. The book is about 500 pages of small print...
By: Sammy Stein
Bryophytes include the mosses (Musci) and liverworts (Hepaticae). These are undoubtedly plants but they lack features of higher plants like vascular tissue. Mosses are concidered by many as posessing leaves and stems while liverworts are thought of as flattened and thalloid (liver-like) in shape but...
By: Sammy Stein
Sexual reproduction in angiosperms was once a taboo sbject. When plants were first classified it was considered very rude (by the stuffy Victorian sponsors of the great plantsmen) to call flower parts anything to do with sex so we have names like stigma, anther, style...
By: M E Skeel
The vast majority of living plant species belong to the group called the Angriosperms or flowering plants. The term denotes the common characteristic of having seeds encased in an ovary and differentiates them from the gymnosperms, in which the seed is 'naked'. Angiosperms are wonderfully...

 

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