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Boy with Glowing Eyes Sees in Complete Darkness



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Blue tabbypoint poes, IC Sainte Phyrine du Blanceperon
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"Boy with Glowing Eyes Sees in Complete Darkness"
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Image by: M.E. Schaap-Tims
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People with super-normal powers pop up every so often. They usually amaze newspaper reporters and befuddle doctors who examine them. The latest example is a boy with "X-ray" eyes that can see clearly in total darkness. His eyes also have the disturbing tendency to glow in the dark.

While experts in China are busy whisking the bemused boy from one medical lab to another, other medical researchers postulate that the boy may be able to see in pitch darkness because his eyes may have more rods than cones.

The cones in the human eye allow color vision, while the rods that are much more sensitive see only in monochrome, a natural gray-scale. Dogs are limited to that kind of vision.

But dogs cannot see in absolute pitch blackness. The young Chinese boy, Nong Yousui, can see in total blackouts.

Phycisians began testing Youhui after his father, Nong Shihua, brought him to a hospital in the southern China city of Dahua. He told the medical staff there he wanted Youhui to be given an eye exam because the boy's eyes were an unnaturally bright blue.

Doctors were stunned after testing Yousui's vision extensively. They discovered the boy could pick out objects and easily read books in rooms that were devoid of any light source.

As experts point out, even night vision technology needs a light source to amplify and allow the user to see. Yousui's remarkable vision exceeds the ability of the most sensitive light vision apparatus.

Yousui's father began worrying about his son's eyes when the boy was just several months old. At the time, doctors reassured the distraught dad that the boy would be just fine and the eyes were functioning and developing normally. But as the Yousui grew older, the blueness of his eyes became more intense. His father also noticed the boy could navigate dark rooms that had others stumbling about and bumping into things to find a lamp.

According to a Chinese television news video reported on by Dvice.com, "Bi Donglei, from the Heng County Television Station in Guangxi also claims that Yousui was able to answer a bunch of questions she handed him in the dark."

Although reporters are referring to the amazing boy's eyes as "cat-eyes," in reality a cat's vision is similar to that of night vision technology and needs some light source, no matter how weak, to amplify.

Vision tests have revealed Yousui's night vision does not rely on any light source.

Ocular photon stream?

Some tests have measured a faint glow being emitted by the boy's eyes. If a light is shown towards them in a dimmed room light up and glow bluish green like cats.

Studies have been done in the past few years suggesting that human eyes emit a photon stream. This may account for the emission of light detected streaming from the boy's eyes.

Canadian researcher Dr. Colin Andrew Ross believes the eyes emit electromagnetic radiation, or photons. His paper, "Electrophysiological Properties of Human Ocular Extramission" present his evidence that the eyes project energy. A similar report issued by the doctor, "The Electrophysiological Basis of Evil Eye Belief" is available as a PDF here.

Understanding the properties of Nong Yousui's incredible eyes may shed more light on the nature of vision and the evolution of human sight.

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More about this author: Terrence Aym

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ARTICLE SOURCES AND CITATIONS
  • InfoBoxCallToAction ActionArrowhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Xfs0R-7cS_s
  • InfoBoxCallToAction ActionArrowhttp://dvice.com/archives/2012/01/chinese-boy-wit.php
  • InfoBoxCallToAction ActionArrowhttp://www.rossinst.com/medical_papers.html
  • InfoBoxCallToAction ActionArrowhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1556-3537.2010.01020.x/pdf