Atmosphere And Weather

An Introduction to a Tornado Watch



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A tornado watch is a term that is used by the National Weather Service in the United States.  Sometimes, people get confused with it.  They have a difficult time determining the difference between a tornado watch and a tornado warning.  Those people need to realize that a tornado watch is used just in case tornadoes or any severe weather patterns do take shape. That doesn't mean tornadoes are expected to occur, and it doesn't mean weather sirens will go off.  On the other hand, if a tornado warning is given by the weather office for a specific county or parish, residents will need to seek shelter from the tornado. 

A typical tornado watch is a watch box which, on a weather map, covers an area.  Generally, it resembles a rectangle, and it can vary in size within square miles.  There could be just one box or a line of boxes on the weather map, perhaps as a result of a strong cold front.  Many TV weather stations work with the National Weather Service to update tornado watches often as possible.

Anyone who are in a tornado watch zone should stay tuned for upcoming severe weather information.  Residents can listen to a radio or watch local TV news for further updates about the storms. In addition, they need to understand what to do if a tornado forms.  Seeking a good shelter such as a basement, crouching down on knees, and staying away from windows are just some priorities that are considered for time being.

People living closely to a tornado watch shouldn't be considered lucky.  They still need to understand that tornadoes have occurred with very little warning.  After the risk of tornadoes or any severe weather has diminished, the watch box may be cancelled by the National Weather Service or expires at a given time. 

It's usual for some people to sense a tornado watch works like a tornado warning.  A watch isn't a warning.  A tornado watch means there's a chance for tornadoes.  Even if that doesn't seem terrible, residents still need to keep informed of any severe weather.  If a tornado does arrive, warning sirens may sound throughout communities.  Then those residents should go and take cover, which will definitely save lives.

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  • InfoBoxCallToAction ActionArrowhttp://www.erh.noaa.gov/rnk/Newsletter/Spring_2007/Storm_Prediction_Center_article.htm